Welcome Lindsay!

Oasis Lactation Services is proud to announce our newest team member who is bringing a phenomenal service!

Why hire a postpartum doula? Get help establishing better sleep rhythms, better feeding rhythms, and learn ways to make the baby time enjoyable. Postpartum doulas are invaluable for adding a second or third baby to the family. They are able to support the older siblings as well as the mom and baby.

Lindsay Tucker is a certifying postpartum doula providing support and care to mothers who need a variety of postpartum services. Lindsay has a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology. She’s been passionate about babies for as long as she can remember and has supported births as a trained Labor Doula and birth photographer. Lindsay breastfed her two sons for a total of 6.5 years and has personal experience with postpartum depression, colic, silent reflux, tongue and lip ties, and tandem nursing. She knows that unnecessary suffering can be prevented with proper support and education and her goal is to help new families get off to a great start.

Postpartum support services include: assistance with baby care, discussion of basic breastfeeding and bottle feeding strategies, assistance with mother care, household help, support to protect co-resting for mother and baby, assistance with older children, baby care information, postpartum stress management, developing exclusive breastfeeding plans, diapering, and more.

Contact Lindsay: lindsayTclc@gmail.com or 404.273.5366 call or text~ $75 for 3 hour session in your home, can book multiple visits

Advertisements

Breastfeeding is MORE than Milk

 Breastfeeding provides perfect nutrition for infants, but it also does much more! Direct nursing at the breast has a whole host of benefits that are easily overlooked in a culture so focused on the milk. Nutrition is only one aspect of infant feeding that leads to growth and development.

Muscle Mechanics:

  The muscle mechanics involved with nursing facilitate optimal cranial-facial development. You’ve probably heard about importance of “tummy time” for the development of head control. Nursing your baby in a laid back position is tummy time made easy! Breastfeeding also coordinated the right and left hemispheres of the brain because the baby is moved from left to right on the mother’s body. This brain development is critical to other developmental milestones like crawling, walking, and later reading. The developing infant palate, mouth, and skull are shaped by feeding. Feeding at the breast helps the baby achieve normal oral motor function and growth.

Skin to Skin:

    Breastfeeding inherently provides the skin to skin contact newborns need for early neurological development, body temperature regulation, and blood sugar regulation. The mother-baby bonding that occurs while a baby is at the breast is unparalleled. Studies show held babies have lower stress hormones.

Increased Maternal Rest:

    Exclusively breastfed infants who sleep in close proximity to their mother replicate their mother’s REM cycles.  Since their sleep is in sync, the baby is more likely to wake for nursing when the mother is not in a deep sleep state.  Maternal sleep is a crucial part of postpartum recovery. Studies show that breastfeeding moms actually sleep about 45 minutes more per night than formula feeding moms.

Better Maternal and Infant Mood:

    Breastfeeding facilitates the release of the “feel good” hormone oxytocin in the mother during “let down” or milk ejection reflex. Mothers of breastfed babies experience less postpartum depression.  Breastmilk contains multiple hormones that promote happiness and relaxation in infants. Breastfed babies also are less likely to have colic.

Infant Sleep/Wake Cycle Regulation:

    When babies are first born they do not make their own sleep hormones. The newborn receives the sleep hormone melatonin directly from breastmilk. The act of suckling at the breast releases a hormone in the baby called CCK, which makes him or her feel full and sleepy. Nursing to sleep is good for babies!

Protection from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome:

    Frequent night wakings to nurse are a large part of normal infant sleep, and serve as nature’s protection against SIDS. Bottle feeding human milk through the night has not shown to be as protective in preventing SIDS as direct nursing at the breast.

The American Association of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life, and continued breastfeeding with complementary solids until at least age 1. Continued support is a huge factor in long term EBF success. A prenatal visit with a lactation consultant or lactation counselor is the first step. An LC can answer your questions and assist you with formulating a breastfeeding friendly birth plan.  If you have already had your baby, schedule a home visit or clinic visit with your LC for an in depth consult that can help your family realize all the benefits of breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding and Maternal Diet

There are thousands of myths about what mothers should or shouldn’t eat when breastfeeding. The current recommendation is that the mother should eat a varied diet of healthy foods that are typical for her geographic region or culture and not limit or include any special foods without medical indication.

To understand why maternal diet should not be restricted, it’s best to examine how milk is made. Milk is made inside glands from the blood stream. Breast milk is NOT made from the mother’s stomach contents. The foods mom eats are broken down in the digestive system. Blood reaches the milk glands where it delivers carbohydrates, nutrients, white blood cells, enzymes, pro- and pre-biotics water, fat, and proteins into the gland.

The foods that mom eats have a long trip to the milk. Not every food is able to pass a whole protein or fat or carbohydrate out of the GI and into the blood stream. Most of the proteins moms eat are broken down substantially in the digestive system. Insoluble fiber is a component of mom’s diet that never leaves the GI and never reaches the milk.

When considering foods to include or avoid when breastfeeding, we must remember that the whole food does not enter the milk. Here is a list of common food myths for nursing mothers and the facts:

MYTH: Broccoli, cabbage, beans, and cucumber give the baby gas.
FACT: Vegetables cause gas because of insoluble fiber mixing with gut bacteria. Insoluble fiber does not leave the GI tract and cannot reach the milk.

MYTH: Spicy food will make the breastmilk spicy.
FACT: Human milk is very sweet. No evidence has been found of capsaicin in human milk. Many moms taste-test their own milk after eating well seasoned food.

MYTH: Strong flavors a like garlic or onions will give the baby colic.
FACT: In a garlic breastmilk study, the babies in the garlic group spent more time at the breast and took more milk. Garlic might be helpful for moms who need to nurse more.

MYTH: If the baby is fussy or has colic, cut dairy.
FACT: Cow milk protein allergy is only in 2-7% of the population. Fussiness is not a symptom for diagnosing cow milk protein allergy.

MYTH: If the baby is gassy or has colic, switch to lactose-free milk
FACT: Lactose is the primary carbohydrate in human milk. It does not come from lactose in mom’s diet. The breast glands make lactose. Lactose intolerance in a newborn is a serious metabolic issue that needs to be addressed by a medical doctor.

MYTH: Mom should avoid soda because it gives the baby gas.
FACT: Carbonated drinks don’t carbonate the blood. The bubbles can’t reach the milk.

MYTH: Peppermint (tea, candy, essential oil) will dry up your milk.
FACT: Some folklore and historic herbal texts list peppermint as a lactogenic herb. There is no science to support either claim. Peppermint is one of the herbal teas listed as compatible with breastfeeding by The Academy of Lactation Policy and Practice.

MYTH: You have to drink milk to make milk.
FACT: Plenty of dairy-free women make milk.

 

Have your own favorite dietary myth to add? Leave us a comment! Breastfeeding myths are a favorite topic at our regular free mother to mother support group.

 

How Much Water Should I Drink?

Many mothers are told that they need to drink a great deal of water in order to make enough milk. So if the idea of 20 glasses a day has your eyeballs floating, fear not! The general recommendation for nursing mothers is drink to thirst.

What does “drink to thirst” mean? For some women, it may mean an increase while in others a decrease in the usual amount of water you drink. Some women tend to eat juicier foods like raw fruits and vegetables that contain a great deal of water. Some women incorporate soups and smoothies into their daily diet. In healthy women, the natural feeling of thirst is the best cue for judging how much to drink.

Many moms report an intense feeling of thirst right at the start or end of a nursing session. If you prefer to nurse in a particular chair, place a water pitcher nearby so you can sip while your baby feeds. Nursing can be a relaxing break for both of you to recharge and refuel.

One of the compounding factors in the belief that women must drink large amounts of water during lactation is the rise in popularity of soft drinks. Teas, coffees, punches, and sodas are often not as hydrating as water. Drinks that contain caffeine often cause mothers to expel water faster. Some vitamin or herb infused drinks may contain ingredients that aren’t compatible with nursing. In general, sugary drinks are not recommended by health care professionals for all people, lactating or not. For some women, lactation increases their thirst even more because they are combating soft drinks, tea, or coffee. They may notice they feel better when they drink more water and should be encouraged to keep up this healthy habit.

Where did the “drink more water” myth come from? It seems on the surface like logic. If we expect a liter or more of fluid to leave the body, we should replace it. And when discussing exercise or sweating in the heat, this is exactly right. Human milk production is different than sitting in a sauna. One of the wonderful things about lactating breasts is that they always take what they need first. If the milk needs more minerals, more fat, or more water, the milk glands will get first pick of what is available in the mother’s body. This is the reason milk around the world is so similar.

Many studies have shown that the composition and quality a human milk is similar across the globe. Studies in both the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition and the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition show that mothers across cultures and economies produce similar milk. Even women facing malnutrition and scarce water make similar milk.

Pregnant mothers take on a great deal of fluid. Increased blood volume, new fat stores, and fluid are all part of nourishing the baby during gestation and lactation. Some of the fluid that made your rings and shoes too tight will make its way into your milk glands. That’s what that fluid in your ankles is for: milk! This is one of the ways breastfeeding helps mothers return to their pre-pregnancy weight.

Some women express that they don’t like plain water. Some smarter choices for making water more magical include adding a slice of fresh citrus like lemon, lime, or orange; adding a splash of natural fruit juice; or making a refreshing spa inspired water with fresh cucumber slices.

Cheers! To Health!

Placenta Encapsulation: A Traditional Galactagogue

Placentophagy is the mammalian act of the mother consuming the placenta after birth. While there are no clinical trials in humans to prove or disprove the effectiveness of this practice, science shows benefits of placentophagy in other mammals. Mammalian placentas contain high levels of prostaglandin which help the uterus shrink back after birth. Anecdotes suggest that mothers have less bleeding post partum when they consume their placentas. The amount of oxytocin in the placenta is also said to aid in lactation. Some also believe placentophagy  can stave off post partum depression.

If you are looking for a placenta preparing service in the Atlanta Metro Area, please scroll to the bottom for breastfeeding friendly providers.

The following instructions and images are for a raw preparation of the placenta.

Tools:

– cutting board
– large chef’s knife or boning/ fillet knife — at least an 8 inch blade to reduce tearing of the placenta
– encapsulation tray and tamper
00 veggie caps
– food processor, herb grinder, or coffee grinder for pulverizing dried placenta
– wax paper or parchment to cover dry work area and capture spills
– dehydrator that adjusts to temperature under 140 degrees F

This is a 4 Step process
1. slice placenta
2. dehydrate placenta
3. grind placenta
4. fill caps with dried placenta

Dehydrate the placenta to get all the water out, but do not cook it. Dry it under 140 degree F to keep the enzymes and bio-active components intact. This placenta pictured here was eventually dried for 24 hours at 100 degrees F.

This is the placenta “shiny side” up. The membranes are the wrinkly layer around the edges. They gather up on each other. The cord and major vessels here will be cut away. Some save the cord and membranes for homeopathic tinctures or to plant with a tree in the child’s honor.

The cord and membranes have been cut away. The placenta is still shiny side up. This is a 10 inch chef’s knife for size reference. The child who grew with this placenta measured 6lbs 10oz and 18 inches, gestation 39 weeks and 3 days.

This is the “dull side” or the side that was attached to the mother’s uterus. This is the “meat” that will be cut away. The dark red-purple spots are blood clots. Either rinse those away or dehydrate them. They will shrink down considerably.

Half of the “meat” has been filleted off  with the membrane left on the bottom. It is very “spider-webby” and spongy. It is possible to feel with the knife that the tissue is too tough to cut through very well.

The tray with the cut placenta before going into the dehydrator

After dehydration

Note how thin and crisp the pieces are after dehydration. All the water is out.

In the food processor bow is ALL of the dried placenta. Note that not much is left after drying. Next to it is red raspberry leaf that this mother chose to add. The addition of optional herbs is completely up to the mother.

This is the capping station. The pill pamper is at the top. The loader tray at the bottom. This is a baking sheet covered with waxed paper to hold spills. The tray brand is Cap M Quik

These are the loaded pills before getting the top of the cap added. They fluffiness of the red raspberry leaf or other dried herb may prevent of uniform filling.

Finished caps

This placenta with herbs yielded 150 caps total.

****

Looking for a certified placenta encapsulator in the Atlanta Metro Area? Check out Melanie at Natural Afterbirth Placenta Services. She is a veteran breastfeeding mother and placenta preparer. Her services include pick up and delivery, in hospital or in home raw smoothie preparation, keepsake placenta printing, placenta chocolate truffles, and both TCM and raw encapsulation methods.

****

The information contained here is not intended to treat, diagnose, or prevent any illness. Pregnant and lactating women should always consult with their health care provider before taking any supplements.

Milk and Cookies!

Lactation Cookies are oatmeal cookies filled with lactogenic ingredients that can help boost a mother’s milk production. While much of the evidence to support foods and herbs as galactogogues is strictly anecdotal, the mother-to-mother traditions of eating these foods are undeniably long standing.

The key ingredients are:

Oats

Ground Flax Seed

Brewer’s Yeast

If you have a favorite oat meal cookie recipe, simply add 2 tablespoons of ground flax seed and 2 tablespoons brewer’s yeast to your regular recipe. Chocolate chips, dried apricot chunks, or another chunky stir in make great additions to the cookies.

If you don’t want to hunt for your recipe, try this one from the Joy of Baking: Oat Meal Cookies

Do you have a perfect cookie recipe to share?

%d bloggers like this: