10 Questions with a HypnoBabies instructor

1) What is labor hypnosis?

Hypnosis for birth is a very effective way to prepare for a birth with fewer interventions and greater comfort. Many women report that their births were completely comfortable without any pain medications. Using hypnosis during labor is a great alternative to an epidural. Basically, you will have harnessed to power of your own mind to change how the sensations of labor and birth are perceived. 

2) Why is labor hypnosis a useful tool?

No matter what kind of birth you are planning, hypnosis is going to equip you with tools that will allow you to remain calm and clear headed, even when plans change. This makes it much easier to enjoy the process of giving birth. Hypnosis has been used in the medical field for quite some time, and is a very successful option for those that have severe reactions or life threatening responses to anesthetics. Birth hypnosis by Hypnobabies has been carefully crafted to address the specific needs of this normal bodily function in the modern world.

3) How does labor hypnosis impact initiation of breastfeeding at birth?

 

When hypnosis is used during birth it prohibits the release of adrenaline. This is a tremendous help in allowing the uterine muscles to work without tension and conflict. When the uterus is functioning optimally during birth it can eliminate the fear, tension, pain syndrome. That elimination means that birth can progress more quickly and more efficiently. Many times there is no need for epidural or narcotic use for pain management. When babies are not exposed to these interventions they are more alert and responsive after birth. This allows us to maximize that ‘Golden Hour’ after birth and early initiation of breastfeeding. Also, the newborns are much less likely to experience side effects such as low respiratory response and therefore are less likely to be separated from their Mom right after birth. 

4) What barriers to breastfeeding does labor hypnosis help reduce or eliminate?

 

Babies that are not removed immediately from their Mom are able to benefit from immediate skin to skin. This facilitates bonding, regulation and familiarity. The biggest barrier to this aspect of breastfeeding might be the Cesarean section. Using hypnosis for birth can certainly greatly reduce the risk for a Cesarean, mostly by eliminating or reducing the use of interventions that can lead to more interventions that may ultimately lead to a surgical birth.

5) Do these hypnosis techniques come in handy after birth?

The hypnosis tools learned in Hypnobabies certainly will continue to be beneficial well after birth. One technique in particular is an instant cue for comfort and healing. This can be so useful for immediate postpartum discomforts such as perineal repair, uterine involution, and any nipple pain while finding a resolution to whatever issue is causing 

6) What do you think are the 3 biggest factors in a birth that impact breastfeeding?

Interventions such as routine IV administration and epidural/narcotics for pain relief 
Cesarean births, in particular those that could have been prevented
Separation of mother and infant

7) How can moms find a labor hypnosis friendly care provider? 

 

Ask! I hear so often that a student or client informed their care provider about using Hypnobabies and they were thrilled. Also, many of my students have been told to seek out birth hypnosis if they desire a low intervention birth. 

8) How can moms find a labor hypnosis educator in their area?

Of course you could search online or try www.Hypnobabies.com 
Word of mouth is a great resource, as well. I get a lot of referrals from local mom’s groups.

9) What skills in Hypnobabies apply to long term breastfeeding success?

 

Hypnobabies focuses on informed consent and we encourage families to continue asking those questions throughout their parenting adventures. Finding support and evidence based guidance is key. Hypnobabies provides that guidance and applicable national and local resources for a successful breastfeeding relationship.

10) What skills in Hypnobabies improve partner support of the breastfeeding relationship? 

Having the partner attend the weekly classes allows the couple to create an even deeper bond with each other and their baby in utero. This bonding helps to foster a union that has impressed me more times than I can count. These partners understand the importance of breastfeeding for both mother and baby and are willing to go the extra mile to help facilitate that. 

Bonus Question! 11) Share your favorite nursing moment?

I’m not sure if it’s my favorite, but it is the most memorable… my son and I weaned from breastfeeding much earlier than I anticipated, unfortunately. About a month later, he got pretty sick with a fever and all the other usual crud that can bring a baby down. He was very snuggly (not his typical nature) and somehow he wound up latched on and nursing for comfort. I was nearly in tears and I relished that short time and knew that it was the last. I don’t know many people that know the exact last nursing session.
Nicole DiBella HCHI, CD
Hypnobabies Instructor, Birth and Postpartum Doula

follow me @NaturalBirthATL

Bonus Question! 11) Share your favorite nursing moment?

I’m not sure if it’s my favorite, but it is the most memorable… my son and I weaned from breastfeeding much earlier than I anticipated, unfortunately. About a month later, he got pretty sick with a fever and all the other usual crud that can bring a baby down. He was very snuggly (not his typical nature) and somehow he wound up latched on and nursing for comfort. I was nearly in tears and I relished that short time and knew that it was the last. I don’t know many people that know the exact last nursing session.

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What is a Normal Feeding Routine? How Does it Change with Age?

The one thing that is certain with babies is they change every day. Knowing what the range of normal is for infant feeding can help parents make better decisions about the family rhythm.

Exclusive Breastfeeding and Human Milk Feeding

0-6 weeks: This is the time when babies nurse constantly. Their tiny tummies want a constant and steady fuel supply, just like they were accustomed to in utero. The placenta nourished the baby so well, hunger is something completely new after being born. It’s easiest to feed babies before they show signs of agitation. Nursing in clusters is common. Nursing every 1-3 hours day and night is normal. Nursing sessions may last 5-35 minutes at a time. Babies frequently fall asleep at the breast and nurse in their sleep. Expect 10-15 nursing sessions per 24 hours. Babies should be fed on cue or on demand. No medical organization endorses scheduled feeds for breastfeeding infants.

6-12 weeks: This period is usually full of what most people call growth spurts. Babies this age are still nursing around the clock. Remember, human milk is digested in about 90 minutes. The tummy is still small, maybe as little as 2 or as many as 5 ounces. Some babies will have a “witching hour” in the early evening where they feed in a cluster of sessions. Babies who have been separated from mom during the day may be particularly interested in a marathon evening nursing session. Nursing and bottle feeding human milk should continue on cue or on demand.

3-6 months: The World Health Organization and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that babies continue to receive only human milk at this time. Babies in this age range have a variety of sleep patterns and growth patterns. Teething may begin during this stage which may disrupt feeding or increase night wakings. All of this is normal. The stomach size is 3-5 ounces. Babies in this age range may increase their nursing or cluster feed just as newborns do. On cue feeding should continue at this age.

Breastfeeding with Complimentary Solids

6-9 months: Most babies will have a first tooth appear at this point. Babies who have a tooth, can sit well unsupported, and have lost the tongue thrust reflex are ready to begin solids in compliment to human milk. Human milk is still recommended as a primary source of nutrition. Ideally, the baby is nursed first then solids are offered as “dessert.” You may have heard “food before 1 is just for fun.” Small amounts of complimentary solids are important for iron and other minerals as stores from birth are utilized by this age. Human milk should be offered on cue. Solid foods can be offered at scheduled meal times.

9-12 months: Most babies are interested in self-feeding. They have mastered the pincer grasp and can put bits of food into their own mouths. Human milk is still the bulk of their nutrition. Some babies may not have had a tooth erupt yet. Nursing through the night is very common.

Nursing a Toddler

12- 15 months: The American Academy of Pediatrics feels this is a safe time to replace human milk with other foods including the milks of other mammals. Many mothers continue to nurse their toddlers for nutrition. Toddlers at this age are busy and may have nutritional gaps because they are out exploring the world instead of eating. Their stomachs may only be a few ounces bigger than they were a year ago. Continuing to breastfeed at this age can help a growing toddler meet nutritional needs during a “picky” phase.

15-18 months: Children who are still nursing may continue to do so at night as well. Mothers commonly explore night weaning around this age. Other mothers are glad to nurse through the night to help with the pain and wakings associated with eruption of molars.

18-24 months: By this age, most children are well established on solids interested in eating with the family at more regular times. Self feeding has been mastered. Many children can drink out of a small cup unassisted. Toddlers who are nursing may nurse frequently or only once a day. The range of normal is very wide.

Full Term Nursing

2 years and beyond: The World Health Organization recommends that children breastfeed for a minimum of 2 years with nursing continuing if both mother and child so desire. Children often self-wean some time after the second birthday. Pregnancy or extended separation may motivate a child to wean faster from nursing.

New Baby Tips: Counting Diapers

Perhaps you’ve been told to count your baby’s diapers to make certain he is getting enough milk. The general rule in the first week is 1 diaper per day of life. How is a new mom supposed to remember that?

Here is a way to label your diapers for the first week to help you keep track. As you go through your stack, the number and letter combo will let you know if your baby is on target or ahead on soiling.

Here are diapers labeled for the first 5 days. If you are on day 3 and diaper 3A or further in the stack, your baby is taking in adequate milk. If your baby is not on target, call your LC for help.

Here are diapers labeled for the first 5 days. If you are on day 3 and diaper 3A or further in the stack, your baby is taking in adequate milk. If your baby is not on target, call your LC for help.

Diapers 1A-3C should accompany you to the hospital or birth center to help you keep track.

Diapers 1A-3C should accompany you to the hospital or birth center to help you keep track.

Diapers 4A-5E are the hardest to remember because mom and baby are so busy feeding and changing frequently.

Diapers 4A-5E are the hardest to remember because mom and baby are so busy feeding and changing frequently.

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