Welcome Lindsay!

Oasis Lactation Services is proud to announce our newest team member who is bringing a phenomenal service!

Why hire a postpartum doula? Get help establishing better sleep rhythms, better feeding rhythms, and learn ways to make the baby time enjoyable. Postpartum doulas are invaluable for adding a second or third baby to the family. They are able to support the older siblings as well as the mom and baby.

Lindsay Tucker is a certifying postpartum doula providing support and care to mothers who need a variety of postpartum services. Lindsay has a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology. She’s been passionate about babies for as long as she can remember and has supported births as a trained Labor Doula and birth photographer. Lindsay breastfed her two sons for a total of 6.5 years and has personal experience with postpartum depression, colic, silent reflux, tongue and lip ties, and tandem nursing. She knows that unnecessary suffering can be prevented with proper support and education and her goal is to help new families get off to a great start.

Postpartum support services include: assistance with baby care, discussion of basic breastfeeding and bottle feeding strategies, assistance with mother care, household help, support to protect co-resting for mother and baby, assistance with older children, baby care information, postpartum stress management, developing exclusive breastfeeding plans, diapering, and more.

Contact Lindsay: lindsayTclc@gmail.com or 404.273.5366 call or text~ $75 for 3 hour session in your home, can book multiple visits

Laid-back Breastfeeding

Laid-back breastfeeding, also called Biological Nurturing, is a method of baby led breastfeeding that starts with the mother first being in a comfortable reclined position. The keys to this position are:

-tummy to tummy on top of mummy

-baby is given time to seek the breast

-baby is free to explore the mother’s body with hands and head

-the nipple is still (mom is not holding the breast as a bottle)

Here’s a video of how this position is achieved on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKoEnqrSkvs

Laid-back nursing is ideal for babies who have latch on difficulties from a high palate,  bubble palate, tongue tie, lip tie, recessed chin, or birth trauma. Most healthy full term babies can achieve this position from birth.

Laid-back breastfeeding increases skin-to-skin which helps babies coordinate better for feeding and improves mom’s milk production. This position also adds gentle pressure to the abdomen to help babies release gas more easily.

Laid-back breastfeeding is the original tummy time, leading to the other label “biological nurturing.” Babies nursed frequently in this position may avoid flat spots on the head and enjoy on or above target physical development because they are engaging in developmental appropriate baby “exercise.”

Tummy down feeding stimulates baby’s inborn feeding reflexes. This position helps the jaw rock forward, the neck and head lift, and the arms work the full range of motion. You may find your baby making motions very similar to swimming in this position. These movements will later translate into skills for rolling, sitting up, pulling to standing, and crawling.

 

10 Questions with a Homebirth Midwife

1) Moms planning a home birth are planning for a low intervention birth. Is the same true for their breastfeeding goals? Do women delivering at home plan to exclusively breastfeed and avoid formula intervention?

Yes. Most women who are planning natural birth also plan to exclusively breastfeed. However, there are situations where a mom chooses not to breastfeed. She may be a victim of sexual abuse or was unable to breastfeed a previous child. We ultimately want women to make the decisions they are most comfortable with after having been provided with as much education and support as possible.

2) What kind of support can a homebirth midwife provide to breastfeeding mothers that is different than a midwife in a hospital or birth center setting?

We offer a lending library that includes breastfeeding books. We offer a one hour prenatal visit so the mother has ample time to discuss her questions, goals, and fears about breastfeeding.

3) What role do you take in prenatal breastfeeding education?

In addition to the support and information provided prenatally, we also suggest the utilization of outside resources like breastfeeding classes, lactation consultants, and La Leche League meetings.

4) What aspects of homebirth uniquely facilitate breastfeeding initiation and establishment?

We are adamant about the necessity of skin to skin contact between mom and baby, with as minimal interruption as humanly possible.  Every aspect of the postpartum experience works better when you just leave them alone. Moms heal faster and babies want to nurse when they are not being poked, prodded, and taken away from mom for reasons that could, in most instances, wait.

5) Describe your breastfeeding-specific training. Does it differ from the training hospital midwives have?

I am not familiar enough to speak on the training of hospital midwives. My experience has grown through living and learning. I nursed all four of my babies at various lengths, based on my education and abilities at the time. I am learning all the time through my clients’ experiences ranging from no intervention to the necessity of an IBCLC or pediatric ENT. I also continue to learn through the support of my peers.

6) Describe the well baby care homebirth midwives give in the first 48 hours. How does this care screen for breastfeeding obstacles?

We usually stay with the mother after birth until baby has latched and is nursing well. If this doesn’t happen for some reason, we are in constant contact until it does. We listen to what moms are describing and make the call for further help based on what they are reporting. We may make another trip back to the house, or, if it seems like an issue that is out of our scope of knowledge, we will refer first to an in-home lactation consultant who is willing to assess mom and baby while maintaining the need for skin to skin contact in their own environment.

7) Do women with gestational diabetes, PCOS, or other endocrine disorders birth at home? What special feeding support do these dyads receive from a midwife?

Yes, and we don’t tend to do anything special unless we are finding it to be an issue. The premise is that it is normal and natural unless it’s not. We aren’t in the business of fixing things that aren’t broken. If we need to refer out for these things, we will.

8) Do Homebirth midwives facilitate informal milk sharing between clients? Why or why not?

Yes. However, not all moms are comfortable with that and we support that, too.

9) What signs or symptoms of feeding challenges do you refer out to an LC?

Baby not gaining weight, latch that just isn’t getting better despite our suggestions of different feeding positions,  mom in extreme pain with cracked, blistered, and bleeding nipples.

10) If a client chooses not to breastfeed, what alternative feeding do you recommend and why?

I usually don’t do much recommending of formula, but I suppose an organic formula of some type if they must. It is extremely rare that a client of ours comes to their six week postpartum visit and is not still exclusively breastfeeding. If they are supplementing with formula, they have already been working with a lactation specialist and have made those decisions together.

Bonus question 11) Share your favorite nursing memory.

I remember a moment nursing my last baby. I nursed all four, but I think I was in a hurry for a lot of that time. Hurry up and quit nursing. Hurry up and walk. Hurry up and potty train. With number four, I knew she was my last and I was thankfully in a place in my life where I didn’t want to hurry anymore. I wanted everything to slow down. I am grateful that I was able to have the awareness to enjoy every single stage with her. I squeezed every last drop. Nursing her one afternoon, she was holding my finger and resting her hand on my chest, while staring into my eyes. I felt in the depths of my being, at that very moment, what an amazing gift to be given the ability to nurse my baby, and I wasn’t going to hurry.

 

Rachel Hart I am a traditional midwife and CPM. I moved to Atlanta from Las Vegas with my husband and four children in 2008. I am a graduate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas with a Bachelor’s degree in English. I began my midwifery journey through an apprenticeship training program in 2005 and began my own practice in 2007.  All four of my children were born at home, the last birth unassisted. I joined Beth at Birthing Way in 2010.

Helping women realize their true power and potential as a woman and mother through the birthing process has been a privilege. I have really enjoyed attending births with the lovely families here in Georgia. I also support the birth community as Secretary of the Georgia Midwifery Association and as Membership Director of the Georgia Birth Network.

 

www.birthingway.com
rachel@birthingway.com
770-597-4478

Thrush – Yeast – Candida

Thrush is a common diagnosis when mom is experiencing nipple pain. Thrush is an overgrowth of a yeast that lives on the skin and in the gut of healthy humans. Thrush may also be referred to as candida albicans.

How Common is Nipple Thrush?

If you ask a group of moms, they’ll tell you thrush or yeast is very common. If you look at the research, a very different picture emerges. Mothers frequently complain of burning nipple pain, nipple damage, yellow or white discoloration in damaged areas of the nipple, sensations of heat or itching, and pain that radiates into the breast. These symptoms are then lumped together as thrush and treatment is prescribed often without a culture. Frequently, mom’s symptoms improve then return. Frequently, another round of anti-microbial treatment is begun.

The latest research on candida and breast yeast informs us that thrush is often the incorrect diagnosis. More women are shown to have staphylococcus aureus than candida, and not all women with one or both positive cultures have pain. In fact, only 15% of the study group experiencing nipple pain had yeast in the culture from swabbing the nipple. Even fewer, 9% had candida in the milk sample (Amir et al). Does ductal thrush even exist? Could it be something else?

Staph aureus has a white to golden color when present on the breast nipple. The common prescribed treatment for candida is miconazole or clotrimazole. Both of these drugs are effective in treating staph aureus as well as candida.

The largest common denominator in these studies on mothers experiencing nipple pain was nipple damage. Nipple damage is caused by a sub-optimal latch.

How Sub-optimal Latch is Misdiagnosed as Thrush

When a baby latches shallow to the breast and does not draw plenty of the areola into the mouth, the nipple is often exposed to inappropriate friction. The baby then must use the jaw and a clamping motion or bite to hold the nipple in the mouth. This can cause a very common condition called a vasospasm. The pressure from the poor latch causes an interruption of blood flow around the nipple. When blood flow returns to normal, a pain called a vasospam may occur. This pain can feel like shooting or burning pain in or around the nipple or deep into the breast. This pain can happen during, after, or between feeds. The solution for this pain is to fix the latch.

One contributing factor to shallow or clamp-down latch is a high arched palate in the nursing baby. These babies often have milk stains on the tongue because the tongue doesn’t rest against the hard palate and clear itself of milk. The milky tongue may look like thrush. Tongue-tie or ankyloglossia is another risk factor.

Sources:
Amir LH, Garland SM, Dennerstein L, Farish SJ: Candida albicans: is it associated
with nipple pain in lactating women? Gynecol ObstetInvest 41:30-34, 1995
Hale TW, Bateman TL, Finkelman MA, Berens PD. The absence of Candida albicans in milk samples of women with clinical symptoms of ductal candidiasis. Breastfeed Med 2009;4:57-61.
http://www.placerconferences.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/G.Why-Does-it-Hurt.pdf

What to Do if Your Culture Came Back Positive for Yeast

Medications: Your health care provider can prescribe medications for both you and your baby that are compatible with breastfeeding. Many mothers feel anxiety about medications and breastfeeding. Remember, your doctor prescribes medications because they have more benefits than risks. If you are interested in reading study data on breastfeeding and taking your prescriptions, contact the Infant Risk Center.
Pumping Guidelines: If your baby depends on pumped milk, keep feeding the pumped milk. If you engage in informal milk sharing, it is wise to take a break from donating until the yeast is cured. If you donate to a milk bank, contact the bank about the medications you are using to clear the infection. If you have an open system pump, be careful. Change the tubing completely. The tubing can’t be sterilized well and should be changed if there is thrush. If you have a closed system pump that is functioning properly, just sterilize the pump parts correctly after each time you pump.

Nursing Guidelines: It’s perfectly safe and beneficial to nurse through thrush. The direct mouth-to-breast nursing is a closed system and transfers antibodies and biochemicals back and forth. Infant saliva on the nipple actually helps change the make up of the milk to meet a babies unique immune needs. The living cells in the milk help fight the infection during the nursing process. The sucking also can help relieve some of the discomfort babies experience when baby also has thrush.

Nipple Care: Your health care provider will probably provide a nipple ointment that is anti-fungal. There are many on the market that are perfectly safe for your baby’s mouth. You may want to consider saline nipple soaks to ease the discomfort and facilitate healing any damage. Using disposable breast pads can reduce staining in your nursing bras and clothing from the ointment.

Laundry and Dishes: Many moms are worried their bras, cloth breast pads, and cloth diapers are harboring yeast. Contact your cloth diaper manufacturer for instructions on how to strip your diapers. Other fabrics can be soaked in vinegar for 24 hours then laundered normally. Pacifiers and bottle nipples can be sterilized daily.

This blog post is informational only and does not serve to diagnose or treat any condition. See your healthcare provider if you suspect a nipple infection.

 

10 Questions with a Doula

1) What is a doula?
         A doula, also known as a birth companion, is a nonmedical person who is trained to assist women before, during, and/or after childbirth as well as her spouse and/or family, by   providing physical assistance and emotional support.
2) Why hire a doula?
        There have been numerous studies that show the benefits of hiring a doula include a decrease in the chance of C-section, decrease in the amount of time a woman spends in labor, decrease in the use of interventions like forceps and vacuum, decrease in the use of epidurals or need for pain medication, decrease the chance of postpartum depression, and increase the satisfaction a woman feels about her birth experience.
 
3) How does having a doula impact initiation of breastfeeding at birth?
        All doulas should be equipped to assist moms with the initiation of breastfeeding after birth. Often times in a hospital setting, nurses might have to leave to attend to another patient leaving the new mom to figure it out on her own. Some hospitals do not have on-site lactation consultants on call around the clock. Having a doula ensures that a knowledgeable person will be there to help if/when needed. 
4) What barriers to breastfeeding does a doula help reduce or eliminate?
    1. Educational barriers: misinformation about breastfeeding, milk production/supply
        2. Emotional barriers: lack of confidence in ability to breastfeed, embarrassment of feeding in public. A doula provides support if the mom is lacking support from family/friends.
        3. Physical barriers: learning how to prepare for breastfeeding, postioning mom and baby for comfortable and sufficient nursing/bonding time.
        4. Medical barriers: Breastfeeding while recovering from c-section, helping to identify potential medical issues such as tongue ties and lip ties and refer to specialists
5) Does a doula come in handy after birth?
        Yes. Doulas routinely remain in close proximity to moms immediately after the birth of their baby. This is to help facilitate the mother’s wishes for skin-to-skin care, breastfeeding initiation as soon as possible, and to answer any questions about newborn care and postpartum care. Many moms also benefit from the services of postpartum doulas. Postpartum doulas contract with the mother and her family for a specified amount of time (hours/weeks) once the family is settled at home after the birth. Postpartum doulas assist with baby care, sibling care, light household chores, and meal prep to help parents acclimate to having a new baby in the home. It can be a great help to have someone onsite those first days/weeks after birth to help with breastfeeding issues among other things, when needed.
6) What do you think are the 3 biggest factors in a birth that impact breastfeeding?
        1. Medications administered during labor and their effects on the mother and the newborn.
        2. Type of birth. If mom has interventions such as forceps, vacuum, or caesarean and baby has a medical issue due to this and they must be separated for an extended amount of time after birth.
        3. The length of the birth. A mom who has a lengthy labor may be extremely fatigued and unable to breastfeed right away.
7) How can moms find a doula friendly care provider?
        1. Moms can ask their care providers how they feel about having a doula in attendance at the birth. Most providers will have a definite opinion one way or the other.
        2. ICAN of Atlanta has a provider review section on their website. Anyone can join ICAN. You do not have to have experienced a c-section. The forums provide excellent information for all expectant moms.
        3. Word of mouth. Ask your friends,  who have used a doula, who their provider was and what the experience was like. If you have already hired a doula, most can tell you of the more popular doula-friendly practices in the area.
8) How can moms find a doula in their area?
        Resources for finding a doula in your area include www.doulamatch.net, www.gabirthnetwork.com, (or local birth networks) asking your provider if they have a list of doulas that they work with, websites of doula certifying organizations such as DONA, CAPPA, and ProDoula, and again referrals from friends/family/mom’s group members who have used a doula’s services before.
9) What skills does a doula have to help with long term breastfeeding success?
       Many doulas have taken breastfeeding classes to assist their clients in the early stages of breastfeeding. For long term breastfeeding success, doulas assist moms through emotional support and encouragement. Many moms give up just because they do not have the support needed to continue. Doulas provide practical information and solutions to assist with challenges associated with breastfeeding. We are knowledgeable about common problems like engorgement, symptoms of clogged milk ducts, mastitis and can refer you back to your care provider or a lactation consultant for added assistance.
10) Do moms need a doula for birth center or home births?
         I believe all moms could benefit from the support of a doula no matter where they choose to give birth. Birth is a very beautiful, but physically and emotionally draining experience. Having a person who has walked the journey before can make it easier by helping to reduce or eliminate the obstacles of fear, anxiety, lack of information, and more because they are a trusted, trained and experienced individual who is there just for the mom.
Bonus Question! 11) Share your favorite nursing moment?

My favorite nursing moment was probably the first time my daughter latched properly. I was unable to successfully breastfeed my older son due to lack of education and support. I became engorged and had painful, cracked, and bleeding nipples. After 3 days of crying (both of us) I gave up. After I had my daughter, I was able to get help from the buses at the hospital. They explained what a good latch looked like and should feel like. They gave me tips for sore nipples, too. So once at home, when she latched with little help from me and with no pain to me, I was very excited. I went on to breastfeed her for 14 months.

Elysia Douglas is a wife, mother of 4, and a professional, certified birth doula in the Metro Atlanta area. In her first 3 years as a doula, she has assisted over 50 families as they prepared for and welcomed their little ones into the world.  She offers attentive, nurturing, and compassionate support during pregnancy, labor, birth, and beyond. Elysia is passionate about equipping, encouraging, and empowering women to achieve their birth goals by providing unbiased, evidence-based information, emotional, and physical support throughout their pregnancy journey. She fully believes in your right to know your options and make decisions that are best for you and your baby. When Elysia is not at prenatal visits, facilitating a childbirth education class, or attending a birth, she enjoys sewing, painting, volunteering in children’s ministry at her church, and spending time with her family and friends.

www.mother2motherlaborsupport.com
http://doulamatch.net/profile/6020/elysia-douglas
www.facebook.com/mother2motherlss
www.instagram.com/mother2motherdoula

Breastfeeding is MORE than Milk

 Breastfeeding provides perfect nutrition for infants, but it also does much more! Direct nursing at the breast has a whole host of benefits that are easily overlooked in a culture so focused on the milk. Nutrition is only one aspect of infant feeding that leads to growth and development.

Muscle Mechanics:

  The muscle mechanics involved with nursing facilitate optimal cranial-facial development. You’ve probably heard about importance of “tummy time” for the development of head control. Nursing your baby in a laid back position is tummy time made easy! Breastfeeding also coordinated the right and left hemispheres of the brain because the baby is moved from left to right on the mother’s body. This brain development is critical to other developmental milestones like crawling, walking, and later reading. The developing infant palate, mouth, and skull are shaped by feeding. Feeding at the breast helps the baby achieve normal oral motor function and growth.

Skin to Skin:

    Breastfeeding inherently provides the skin to skin contact newborns need for early neurological development, body temperature regulation, and blood sugar regulation. The mother-baby bonding that occurs while a baby is at the breast is unparalleled. Studies show held babies have lower stress hormones.

Increased Maternal Rest:

    Exclusively breastfed infants who sleep in close proximity to their mother replicate their mother’s REM cycles.  Since their sleep is in sync, the baby is more likely to wake for nursing when the mother is not in a deep sleep state.  Maternal sleep is a crucial part of postpartum recovery. Studies show that breastfeeding moms actually sleep about 45 minutes more per night than formula feeding moms.

Better Maternal and Infant Mood:

    Breastfeeding facilitates the release of the “feel good” hormone oxytocin in the mother during “let down” or milk ejection reflex. Mothers of breastfed babies experience less postpartum depression.  Breastmilk contains multiple hormones that promote happiness and relaxation in infants. Breastfed babies also are less likely to have colic.

Infant Sleep/Wake Cycle Regulation:

    When babies are first born they do not make their own sleep hormones. The newborn receives the sleep hormone melatonin directly from breastmilk. The act of suckling at the breast releases a hormone in the baby called CCK, which makes him or her feel full and sleepy. Nursing to sleep is good for babies!

Protection from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome:

    Frequent night wakings to nurse are a large part of normal infant sleep, and serve as nature’s protection against SIDS. Bottle feeding human milk through the night has not shown to be as protective in preventing SIDS as direct nursing at the breast.

The American Association of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life, and continued breastfeeding with complementary solids until at least age 1. Continued support is a huge factor in long term EBF success. A prenatal visit with a lactation consultant or lactation counselor is the first step. An LC can answer your questions and assist you with formulating a breastfeeding friendly birth plan.  If you have already had your baby, schedule a home visit or clinic visit with your LC for an in depth consult that can help your family realize all the benefits of breastfeeding.

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