Laid-back Breastfeeding

Laid-back breastfeeding, also called Biological Nurturing, is a method of baby led breastfeeding that starts with the mother first being in a comfortable reclined position. The keys to this position are:

-tummy to tummy on top of mummy

-baby is given time to seek the breast

-baby is free to explore the mother’s body with hands and head

-the nipple is still (mom is not holding the breast as a bottle)

Here’s a video of how this position is achieved on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PKoEnqrSkvs

Laid-back nursing is ideal for babies who have latch on difficulties from a high palate,  bubble palate, tongue tie, lip tie, recessed chin, or birth trauma. Most healthy full term babies can achieve this position from birth.

Laid-back breastfeeding increases skin-to-skin which helps babies coordinate better for feeding and improves mom’s milk production. This position also adds gentle pressure to the abdomen to help babies release gas more easily.

Laid-back breastfeeding is the original tummy time, leading to the other label “biological nurturing.” Babies nursed frequently in this position may avoid flat spots on the head and enjoy on or above target physical development because they are engaging in developmental appropriate baby “exercise.”

Tummy down feeding stimulates baby’s inborn feeding reflexes. This position helps the jaw rock forward, the neck and head lift, and the arms work the full range of motion. You may find your baby making motions very similar to swimming in this position. These movements will later translate into skills for rolling, sitting up, pulling to standing, and crawling.

 

10 Questions with a Homebirth Midwife

1) Moms planning a home birth are planning for a low intervention birth. Is the same true for their breastfeeding goals? Do women delivering at home plan to exclusively breastfeed and avoid formula intervention?

Yes. Most women who are planning natural birth also plan to exclusively breastfeed. However, there are situations where a mom chooses not to breastfeed. She may be a victim of sexual abuse or was unable to breastfeed a previous child. We ultimately want women to make the decisions they are most comfortable with after having been provided with as much education and support as possible.

2) What kind of support can a homebirth midwife provide to breastfeeding mothers that is different than a midwife in a hospital or birth center setting?

We offer a lending library that includes breastfeeding books. We offer a one hour prenatal visit so the mother has ample time to discuss her questions, goals, and fears about breastfeeding.

3) What role do you take in prenatal breastfeeding education?

In addition to the support and information provided prenatally, we also suggest the utilization of outside resources like breastfeeding classes, lactation consultants, and La Leche League meetings.

4) What aspects of homebirth uniquely facilitate breastfeeding initiation and establishment?

We are adamant about the necessity of skin to skin contact between mom and baby, with as minimal interruption as humanly possible.  Every aspect of the postpartum experience works better when you just leave them alone. Moms heal faster and babies want to nurse when they are not being poked, prodded, and taken away from mom for reasons that could, in most instances, wait.

5) Describe your breastfeeding-specific training. Does it differ from the training hospital midwives have?

I am not familiar enough to speak on the training of hospital midwives. My experience has grown through living and learning. I nursed all four of my babies at various lengths, based on my education and abilities at the time. I am learning all the time through my clients’ experiences ranging from no intervention to the necessity of an IBCLC or pediatric ENT. I also continue to learn through the support of my peers.

6) Describe the well baby care homebirth midwives give in the first 48 hours. How does this care screen for breastfeeding obstacles?

We usually stay with the mother after birth until baby has latched and is nursing well. If this doesn’t happen for some reason, we are in constant contact until it does. We listen to what moms are describing and make the call for further help based on what they are reporting. We may make another trip back to the house, or, if it seems like an issue that is out of our scope of knowledge, we will refer first to an in-home lactation consultant who is willing to assess mom and baby while maintaining the need for skin to skin contact in their own environment.

7) Do women with gestational diabetes, PCOS, or other endocrine disorders birth at home? What special feeding support do these dyads receive from a midwife?

Yes, and we don’t tend to do anything special unless we are finding it to be an issue. The premise is that it is normal and natural unless it’s not. We aren’t in the business of fixing things that aren’t broken. If we need to refer out for these things, we will.

8) Do Homebirth midwives facilitate informal milk sharing between clients? Why or why not?

Yes. However, not all moms are comfortable with that and we support that, too.

9) What signs or symptoms of feeding challenges do you refer out to an LC?

Baby not gaining weight, latch that just isn’t getting better despite our suggestions of different feeding positions,  mom in extreme pain with cracked, blistered, and bleeding nipples.

10) If a client chooses not to breastfeed, what alternative feeding do you recommend and why?

I usually don’t do much recommending of formula, but I suppose an organic formula of some type if they must. It is extremely rare that a client of ours comes to their six week postpartum visit and is not still exclusively breastfeeding. If they are supplementing with formula, they have already been working with a lactation specialist and have made those decisions together.

Bonus question 11) Share your favorite nursing memory.

I remember a moment nursing my last baby. I nursed all four, but I think I was in a hurry for a lot of that time. Hurry up and quit nursing. Hurry up and walk. Hurry up and potty train. With number four, I knew she was my last and I was thankfully in a place in my life where I didn’t want to hurry anymore. I wanted everything to slow down. I am grateful that I was able to have the awareness to enjoy every single stage with her. I squeezed every last drop. Nursing her one afternoon, she was holding my finger and resting her hand on my chest, while staring into my eyes. I felt in the depths of my being, at that very moment, what an amazing gift to be given the ability to nurse my baby, and I wasn’t going to hurry.

 

Rachel Hart I am a traditional midwife and CPM. I moved to Atlanta from Las Vegas with my husband and four children in 2008. I am a graduate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas with a Bachelor’s degree in English. I began my midwifery journey through an apprenticeship training program in 2005 and began my own practice in 2007.  All four of my children were born at home, the last birth unassisted. I joined Beth at Birthing Way in 2010.

Helping women realize their true power and potential as a woman and mother through the birthing process has been a privilege. I have really enjoyed attending births with the lovely families here in Georgia. I also support the birth community as Secretary of the Georgia Midwifery Association and as Membership Director of the Georgia Birth Network.

 

www.birthingway.com
rachel@birthingway.com
770-597-4478

Bringing Your Newborn Home

Bringing your infant home can be both exciting and scary. You may wonder what your family’s new normal will look like. Many refer to this period of time as the “fourth trimester,” or the period of time when mom and baby both adjust to their new physically separate states. This adjustment takes place over the course of several months. When your baby is first born he or she has no experience with the world beyond the womb. Certain things can facilitate the ease of this transition from the womb to your arms. Bonding is the name of the game during the first days home. “Eat, bond, sleep, repeat” becomes the new mother’s mantra.

    The natural habitat of the human infant is mother’s breast. Your baby will likely spend most of his or her time there for the first few months. Since newborn nutrition is such a large part of life with a new baby, taking a prenatal breastfeeding class is essential. You may wish to speak to an LC one on one to discuss your questions or concerns specific to your family prior to your baby’s arrival.  A prenatal breastfeeding consult is a helpful tool for preparing you with information about establishing the nursing relationship. Most of the time in Atlanta area hospitals, you will have the opportunity to receive a quick consult from a hospital lactation consultant prior to your discharge. This consult is generally brief. Many families still have questions and concerns regarding breastfeeding after returning home. Many new moms prefer to schedule home visits with their LC to stay in the comfort of  home during the recovery period.

 Breastmilk is digested in 90 minutes. Expect to nurse your baby 10-15 times per 24 hours. Many first time mothers worry that their baby nursing frequently is a sign that they do not make enough milk. This is usually not the case. Colostrum, or newborn milk, is present in your breasts starting early in the third trimester. It is nutritionally rich and very little is required to fill a new baby’s tiny stomach. If your baby experiences the common condition “jaundice” also called hyperbilirubinemia, colostrum is a powerful laxative that will help resolve it. Within the first few days your milk will transition to “mature milk.” Each time your baby nurses, it signals your body to make more milk. Frequent on-cue nursing during the newborn period generally equates to a robust milk supply in the long term. Exclusive breastfeeding or “EBF” and avoiding formula are common goals for many mothers. This goal is attainable with access to breastfeeding education and breastfeeding help if necessary.

    The best indicator of adequate intake is output. Normal diaper count is 6-10 wet or dirty diapers daily. In the first week, counting diapers can give you reassurance that your baby is indeed eating enough. Your baby should have at least one stool per each day of life. Day one- 1 poop, Day two- 2 poops, Day three- three poops, and so on. “Cluster feeding” or blocks of frequent nursing are common. Although nursing is frequent, it should never feel painful. Your baby will likely love to be held on your chest close to your breasts even when he or she is not nursing.

    Skin to skin contact is crucial for your newborn.  Skin to skin regulates the infant’s body temperature and blood sugar. It also facilitates important early neurological development. The simple act of holding your baby skin to skin stimulates production of hormones in both the mother and baby that keep everyone feeling relaxed and calm.  Your partner can help you with this important bonding process by doing things like screening phone calls, entertaining visitors, bringing you food and drinks, changing diapers, and caring for older children. Your partner should encourage you to rest as much as possible while your baby sleeps.

Newborn sleep gets a lot of publicity. When babies are born, they do not make their own sleep hormones. They receive their sleep hormones from their mother via breastmilk and suckling. This is why many babies nurse to sleep. Nursing to sleep is biologically normal and natural. Many people refer to babies “having their days and nights confused.” This is not the case. Babies are not born with a light/dark cycle. One will eventually develop with time, but during the newborn period frequent night wakings are to be expected.  Frequent waking to nurse is part of nature’s protection against SIDS. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a form of co-sleeping that is referred to as “rooming in” for the first six months of life as a measure of SIDS risk reduction. Sleeping in close proximity to your baby also allows to have a heightened awareness of your baby’s hunger cues throughout the night.

Your new baby’s first days at home will likely seem like more of a whirlwind than pregnancy.  Prenatal breastfeeding education and accurate expectations of the newborn period can make this transition much more manageable for families. However, there will be times that you don’t know what to do. When in doubt just do less, nurse more, and call your LC!

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