7 Things You Can Do Right Now with a Fussy Baby

Hop in the Bath
Babies love baths. Mommies often need one too. Co-bathing can calm and focus your baby. Babies who are frustrated at the breast often respond well to nursing in the bath.

Magic Baby Hold
It’s magic. Hold the baby like this. Magic Baby Hold with Bill

Swing and Sway
Not just the baby swing. Babies calm faster in arms. Swing with your baby on your lap on your porch swing or glider.

Nurse in a Carrier
Nursing in a carrier allows the baby to be upright and compressed. This helps with reflux symptoms and gas.

Play with Temperature
Take some frozen milk out and spoon feed it to your baby or put it in a mesh feeder. The cold is exciting and different.

Get Outside
Even if the weather is crummy, just standing on the porch may change things.

Play with Texture
Let your baby touch something interesting and new. A tooth brush or cotton ball or sand or salt. Watch that these things stay away from the mouth. Novel sensory experiences can change your baby’s outlook pretty rapidly.

Film Screening “Breastmilk” in Roswell, GA

Oasis Lactation Services is pleased to announce our sponsorship for the screening of the documentary film “Breastmilk” produced by Ricki Lake and Abby Epstein. This film, from the women who brought us “The Business of Being Born,” focuses on the breastfeeding and postpartum experiences of a variety of women and families.

Wednesday December 4th, 2013. Seating begins at 7:15pm. 7:30pm film starts, and expo and special guest Q & A following

Aurora Cineplex is located at 5100 Commerce Parkway, Roswell, GA 30076

More information from Belies to Babies Foundation

Finding Your Perfect Lactation Counselor: Meet Meredith

meredithfall2013It helps to work with someone who has been where you are when mothering is hard. Meet Meredith and read her success story that includes a cesarean birth, lip tie, tongue tie, and over supply.

Meredith Jacobsen has been helping individuals and couples transition into parenthood for over a decade. Working first as a nanny, newborn specialist, postpartum doula, and then labor doula before finally serving as a lactation counselor, she has assisted with every step along the way of this transformative time.

Meredith provides home visits for Oasis Lactation Services. She enjoys working with families, one on one, in their home to give them the information and confidence they need to reach their breastfeeding goals. This personalized assistance can help with troubleshooting breastfeeding issues like latch or milk supply difficulties as well as addressing questions about normal newborn behavior and parenting, such as sleep patterns or pumping and preparing to return to work. She also enjoys supporting growing families by teaching prenatal breastfeeding and baby care classes in a group setting.

On a personal level, Meredith understands the challenges that can come with breastfeeding after a difficult birth. Surgical deliveries can often lead to physical challenges with breastfeeding as well as emotional challenges, especially when the mother was preparing for a natural birth. Luckily, these can be minimized by preparing during pregnancy by taking classes, getting involved in support groups, and knowing who to call if you need help after the birth.

After spending years working as a labor doula and preparing for a natural water birth, Meredith was crestfallen when she needed a cesarean. Exhausted and emotionally drained from a long labor and recovering from surgery, she also found herself struggling with the ability latch thanks to her daughter’s lip and tongue ties and her own issues with oversupply.

Thankfully, she had a support system in place to assist with these difficulties. She was able to overcome all of these challenges and breastfeed her daughter without any supplementation. They have met the World Health Organization’s recommended six months of exclusive breastfeeding and continue to have an enjoyable nursing relationship while adding complementary solids. This healthy, happy nursing relationship has been a healing experience after a disappointing birth. And because of that, Meredith is especially passionate about helping other mothers who have struggled with births that did not go as planned.

Gallery of Pumped Milk

Human milk changes color, texture, and composition throughout the day and as the baby ages. This gallery of milk is for informational purposes so mothers can feel confident that their milk still “looks good.”

Some important points on the look of pumped milk:
- The visible fat layer is not an indication of how much fat is in the milk. Human milk doesn’t fully separate when left standing.

- Human milk varies in fat content from 3-10% throughout the day.

- The color of milk can and will change

- Human milk is about 87% water. Watery looking milk is normal.

- Milk can look blue, white, or other colors. Diet and food coloring may impact the color of pumped milk.

- Separation of milk is not an indicator that the milk is spoiled. Separation is normal.

 

Our gallery is growing! If you’d like to submit a photo of your pumped milk, please include the age of your baby (or babies for twin and tandem nursing moms) and time of day you pumped to milkmakingmom [at] gmail.com

We will keep your identifying information confidential.

This gallery is for informational purposes only and is not meant to treat or diagnose any condition. It is our goal to showcase the wide range of milk pumping experiences.

 

This is refrigerated milk that a tandem nursing mother pumped on day 3 postpartum. She has heavy oversupply.

This is refrigerated milk that a tandem nursing mother pumped on day 3 postpartum. She has heavy oversupply.

Milk pumped after feeding 5 day old baby around midday.

Milk pumped after feeding 5 day old baby around midday.

This milk was pumped by a mom with oversupply at 3 days postpartum.

This milk was pumped by a mom with oversupply at 3 days postpartum.

This milk was pumped at work around 10:30am. Baby is 12 weeks old.

This milk was pumped at work around 10:30am. Baby is 12 weeks old.

This milk was pumped at 8:30AM. The baby is 4 months and 6 days old. The previous pumping session was  4:00AM. This mom pumps 6-8 times daily.

This milk was pumped at 8:30AM. The baby is 4 months and 6 days old. The previous pumping session was 4:00AM. This mom pumps 6-8 times daily.

This milk was pumped while the baby was nursing on the other side. The baby is 11 weeks old. The milk was pumped at 6:30am.

This milk was pumped while the baby was nursing on the other side. The baby is 11 weeks old. The milk was pumped at 6:30am.

New Baby Tips: Counting Diapers

Perhaps you’ve been told to count your baby’s diapers to make certain he is getting enough milk. The general rule in the first week is 1 diaper per day of life. How is a new mom supposed to remember that?

Here is a way to label your diapers for the first week to help you keep track. As you go through your stack, the number and letter combo will let you know if your baby is on target or ahead on soiling.

Here are diapers labeled for the first 5 days. If you are on day 3 and diaper 3A or further in the stack, your baby is taking in adequate milk. If your baby is not on target, call your LC for help.

Here are diapers labeled for the first 5 days. If you are on day 3 and diaper 3A or further in the stack, your baby is taking in adequate milk. If your baby is not on target, call your LC for help.

Diapers 1A-3C should accompany you to the hospital or birth center to help you keep track.

Diapers 1A-3C should accompany you to the hospital or birth center to help you keep track.

Diapers 4A-5E are the hardest to remember because mom and baby are so busy feeding and changing frequently.

Diapers 4A-5E are the hardest to remember because mom and baby are so busy feeding and changing frequently.

Syringe and Cup Feeding

Bottles may be the most common way we see babies fed, but aren’t the only way to feed a baby off the breast. Some mothers want to avoid bottle preference or choose an alternate feeding method to help the baby get back to the breast. Please visit this article on proper techniques for bottle feeding human milk.

Syringe feeding is often employed by families whose babies need short term supplementation while they develop breastfeeding skills. Syringe feeding is sometimes done in tandem with oral exercises under the supervision of an LC, SLP, pediatrician, or other specialist. Oasis Lactation Services prefers curved tipped periodontal syringes for this feeding method. Theses syringes are generally sold in 10-12 cc volume, which is about 1/3 ounce.  It is important to know if the syringes you are using are precision measured or an estimate.

syringe

General Guidelines for Syringe Feeding Your Baby

  1. Fill syringe with expressed breast milk (or formula if supplementation is required).
  2. Sit baby upright on your lap with baby’s head supported, at a 45 degree angle or taller. Baby should not be flat on back.
  3. Stroke baby’s face to stimulate gape response. Gently drag finger down from tip of baby’s nose to the chin. When baby opens wide, offer finger to suck, pad side up.
  4. Once baby begins to suck, introduce syringe to the corner of the mouth. Point the tip of the syringe into the cheek. The tip is rigid. Do not allow the tip of the syringe to touch the gums.
  5. Responsively depress plunger as baby is sucking on finger. The baby is only able to swallow small amounts. The baby needs time between pulses of milk to coordinate breathing. One pulse of milk should be followed by a swallow and two or three sucks.

Cup feeding for supplementation off the breast may be a good choice for several reasons. Cups are easy to sterilize unlike rubber nipples. Cup technology is available around the world in all cultures. Cup feeding teaches baby oral skills that he will use for a lifetime. Babies who are cup feeding learn tongue extension, which is a useful skill for drawing the breast deep into the mouth to nurse.

General Guidelines for Cup Feeding Your Baby

  1. Sit baby upright on your lap with baby’s head supported, at a 45 degree angle or taller. Baby should not be flat on back.
  2. Use a small medicine cup or shot glass.
  3. Place the edge of the cup gently on baby’s lower lip.
  4. Bring the liquid to baby’s lower lip so baby will lap it up like a cat drinking milk from a bowl. Do not pour the liquid in baby’s mouth
  5. It is important to maintain the level of the liquid as best as possible so baby can continually lap it up.
  6. Go slowly as the two of you learn how to do this. Eventually, this can become a very fast and efficient way of feeding until baby learns to take the breast, and this is a good method to use to avoid artificial nipples and teats. This method also encourages tongue extension which is helpful training for babies who have had tongue tie revision or therapy for shallow latching.

See Us in Pregnancy and Newborn Magazine!

The August 2013 issue of Pregnancy and Newborn Magazine features an article about common breastfeeding myths and was written by OLS owner Danielle Downs Spradlin. Some of the myths the article explores include myths about maternal diet, medications for nursing mothers, and alcohol consumption while nursing.

Check out the full article by clicking here!

 

Our favorite excerpt is on beer and milk supply:

Myth: Drinking a beer daily improves milk supply.

Where it comes from: Fermented nutrition beers for pregnant and lactating women are described throughout historic documents from ancient Egypt to more recent times. Drinks called “small beers” were regularly recommended for women and children as well and had low alcohol content. These fermented drinks were low in foodborne illness (because of alcohol fermentation) and high in nutrients because of the grains they were made from. Brewing wines and beers has been of great cultural significance for all of written history.

What science says: Alcohol inhibits milk production. Alcohol may impact the flavor of human milk and cause babies to nurse less, leaving mom with fuller breasts and thus believing she is making more milk. Alcohol also slows the milk ejection reflex. However, animal studies have shown that some of the compounds in certain grains may improve the blood level of prolactin, the hormone responsible for milk production. If these compounds have the same effect on human milk production, eating nutritiously prepared whole grains is probably more ideal.

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